an investigative photo documentary

Exclusive 21-page photo essay from our investigative journalist team in collaboration with award-winning photojournalist Nir Kafri. Location: Tel Aviv, Israel Copyright Wondereur 2018.

MEET with artist Noga Shlomi curated by internationally acclaimed artist Sigalit Landau.

Cover shlomi
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WHAT HAPPENS WHEN YOU HAVE A FLAT TIRE AND YOU’RE SUDDENLY STUCK ON THE ROAD?
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You’re in a place that you’re not supposed to be in – it’s a place for cars, not for you. Everything feels out of proportion.
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When you’re at home, everything is perfectly sized to you, the space is designed for you.
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WHEN YOU’RE GOING THROUGH AN UNFAMILIAR EXPERIENCE, SOMETHING HAPPENS TO TIME AND SPACE.
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At some point, a lot of people were doing post-apocalyptic art, trying to describe life after a disaster. But I find that what happens in real life is different. There are all these moments of waiting that I find fascinating.
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IN FACT, LIFE AFTER A DISASTER LOOKS LIKE REGULAR LIFE. IT’S HARD TO ACCEPT.
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I THINK TRAGEDY IS ALWAYS IMMINENT.
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Bad things happen to everyone. It’s universal. You're born, you love, you lose the people you love, you get your heart broken, and then it's just life.
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I’M TRYING TO FIGURE OUT THE BEAUTY IN IT.
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When my father was dealing with cancer, he used to say, ‘If it wasn't my health, if it wasn't my life, it would be a very interesting problem.’
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DISASTERS ACT ON US IN THIS WEIRD WAY. THEY COMPRESS A LOT OF ISSUES IN A VERY SHORT TIME.
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I LIVED IN A COMMUNE IN BEERSHEVA, A JEWISH-ARAB PROJECT WHEN I WAS 18.
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There were a lot of workshops and intense discussions. We studied together and worked together in Arab schools, in unrecognized Bedouin villages, and also in Jewish schools. And then I went to the army, in which I was a tour guide in the Golan Heights. It’s not a well-known army job but a lot of people are sent to work with the Society for the Protection of Nature and work on ecological projects.
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THAT’S WHEN I STARTED TO REALLY BE INTERESTED IN HOW WE CAN BRIDGE DISTANCES AND POINTS OF VIEW.
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Some spaces really hold distance, like these Internet cafés in South Tel Aviv. Many African asylum seekers live in the area. It’s a complex political situation but what struck me in these cafés is the distance that separates these people from their families.
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You can also look at the rituals around mourning as a way to bridge the distance between people. Women cook and talk and it can be very annoying, but it’s a loving process too.
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A lot of my projects start from personal memories of places and moments that changed me.
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I USE ART TO ASK QUESTIONS AND GET AN ANSWER FROM IT. IT’S A THINKING PROCESS.