an investigative photo documentary

Exclusive 19-page photo essay from our investigative journalist team in collaboration with award-winning photojournalist Shaun Roberts. Location: Sacramento, United States Copyright Wondereur 2021.

MEET with artist Megan Morgan curated by prominent art collector Kenneth Montague.

Title page morgan
A
AFTER SCHOOL, KIDS WOULD CHASE ME HOME AND BEAT ME UP.
B
I didn’t want people to take notice of me, but I always stood out.
C
I remember always being scared on my way to and from school. My grandparents would tell me, ‘You have to do this, you’re always going to have to deal with this.’
D
IT WAS LIKE SURVIVAL IN A WAY.
E
Today, I love reading about other people’s stories, and their search for their parents and finding out about their ethnic history.
F
NO ONE IS GOING TO BE HUNDRED PERCENT ANYTHING. THAT’S JUST THE HISTORY OF THE WORLD.
G
I find it endlessly fascinating how we identify ourselves. In the U.S., it's the one-drop rule: if you have up to 1/8th, then you are black, and it doesn't matter what you look like. People are not realizing that these equations were put in place during slavery, so that they could say, ‘You’re almost my slave and so are your children, and your children’s children.’ It was about economics and people not having a voice.
H
NOW IT’S A SOCIAL ISSUE: DO YOU NOT WANT TO BE BLACK? ARE YOU ASHAMED OF BEING BLACK?
I
J
AS I GOT OLDER, I BECAME MORE VOCAL. I WANTED THE WORLD TO HEAR AND SEE ME ON MY OWN TERMS.
K
Art is a way of helping me deal with those prejudices – to start the conversation rather than somebody else telling me what I should feel, how I should be or what I should think.
L
GROWING UP, I HAD A VISION OF MYSELF AS JUST ME, NOT ANYTHING ELSE.
M
It wasn’t until other kids had pointed it out that I saw myself as racially different.
N
I was born in Bermuda, and when I was six, my parents passed away. I moved to North America to live with my grandparents. They are Caucasian, but I grew up calling them mom and dad.
O
P
I am always digging for more information about my ancestry, but I don't think of myself as being incomplete without it.
Q
I didn’t have any black role models growing up. Now, as a mother and an educator, I think we all have a responsibility to teach people about Black history.
R
KNOWLEDGE IS POWER. AND THE HISTORY BOOKS ARE WRITTEN BY THE VICTORS.